Subject Verb Agreement For Percentages

The verb in both sentences is correct depending on whether you are writing about an event in the present or in the past. (The importance of “in business” is complicated and ambiguous.) The word population is a collective noun that, depending on the author`s intention, can take either a singular verb or a pluralistic verb. In our pop quiz 3, we wanted to indicate that this percentage represents a single group. In your example, the author intends the population to be the plural form, because the percentage should not indicate a single group. 3. Nearly 25% of the population is Muslim. The word population is a collective noun that, depending on the author`s intention, can take either a singular verb or a pluralistic verb. This is to indicate that this percentage represents a single group. Our rule 6 of the subject and verb agreement says, “Usually use a plural verb with two or more subjects when they are connected. Which sentence is correct: “A flood of Tribune employees registers for buyouts” OR “A flood of Tribune employees registers for buyouts.”? I saw that title online today, and it`s wrong to say “signs.” I think that since “Flood” refers to the plural collective of People, the verb should correspond to humans rather than Flood, although this is the object of the preposition. I would like to know if my assumption is correct. Thank you! If the subject is only one, a singular verb should be used. In addition, our rule 1 of number writing says, “Write down all the numbers that begin a sentence.” To be consistent, we advise you to spell the two numbers.

The phrase “one in fifteen” does not require hyphens. Write, “One in fifteen people in Wisconsin doesn`t have health insurance.” John, I just read the phrase “The couple is on their honeymoon in Barbados” in one of our broadcast newspapers, and unlike you, it seemed contradictory to my ears. After completing high school in 1966, I can only assume that there may have been different priorities during the educational process in the United States and Ireland. By the way, when I interviewed a number of friends – usually under the age of 30 – I had 60/40% at first, who tended to use “are” in the sentence below. I wonder if there is a definitive legal interpretation of the verb to be used in this case? The names of sports teams that don`t end on “s” are going to take on a plural beak: The Miami Heat have searched, the Connecticut Sun are hoping for new talent.


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